Rhythm Reading Plan: Day Fourteen

Forgiven
Psalm 25:6-10

Have you ever been scared to go to God after you’ve done something wrong? Do you feel unworthy to pray or even read your Bible? One of the most damaging aspects of sin is that it often drives us further from the only One who can offer us healing and forgiveness.

Maybe you have the opposite problem.

Do you tend to downplay your sin? Do you assume that time itself will wash away your transgressions? Underestimating the seriousness of our sin is also destructive and harms our relationship with God.

But we don’t need to give up in despair.

In Psalm 25 Israel’s King, David, shows us the better way. The psalm was written during a period David’s life when he was old enough to look back on his youth and at a time when his enemies were many. At this point the great king had amassed many successes and many failures. But David doesn’t hide from God in fear or ignore his sin in pride. David humbly admits he’s a sinner…and then asks God to forget those sins!

Why did David have the confidence, even the audacity, to ask our holy God to forget his sins? It’s certainly not because of anything he had done. David didn’t remind God of the time he killed a giant or won a battle or danced with joyful praise. David knew that he was simply a man and that everything good was from God anyway.

So what did David do? As if God needed it, David reminded Him of His own character. He appealed to God’s mercy, goodness and steadfast love. He knew it was his only chance. It’s also our only chance.

We can’t hide. We can’t minimize. Honest confession of our sins to God is a healthy part of our spiritual rhythm.

Standing, as we are, on this side of history we know that the promised Messiah, from David’s line, has come. His mercy is “from of old,” but it’s also right here, right now and it makes all things new.  

APPLY:

  • Do you tend to hide from God when you mess up?
  • Or do you minimize your sin?
  • Will you confess your sins to God with boldness and humility?

Devotional Contributed by Alan C. Duncan


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